Sunday, 14 July 2013

Measure by Weight not Volume!



Gluten free flours are not created equal! If you want to achieve successful results with your bread then weigh your flours!

Flour by volume differs because of so many factors including humidity, storage and handling, type of grain, shipping, settling, and how the home baker measures a cup – scoop or spoon.

For example a cup of sorghum flour IS NOT equivalent to a cup of potato starch … or rice flour!

It is more so important to weigh your flours for bread baking. Ratios are the skeleton key to all bread recipes whether regular gluten bread or gluten free bread. The ratio of total dry weight and the balance of liquids or hydration of the bread is how we create the difference between a sandwich loaf and a ciabatta loaf.

Also weight measuring in baking gives you absolute freedom to tailor a recipe to be able to use any of the flours that make you happy. You can sub in any flour you like as long as the total dry weight is the same in the end.  You cannot say the same for cup to cup substitutions.

I highly recommend to buy a set of scales and for convenience this chart will help you with the many recipes still using the volume method.

(Also, remember this: if you want to convert your favorite gluten recipe gluten-free? Start by subbing 140 grams of your flour mix for every 1 cup of gluten AP flour.)

Gluten-Free Flour Volume-Weight Conversions
Flour
Properties
1 cup weight (grams)
Almond flour
High in protein, nutty flavour
112

Amaranth flour
Nutty flavour, creates nice crust, denser than some other gf flours
120


Arrowroot
Starch in combo with heavier flours, sub for cornstarch and good thickener for foods that will be frozen/thawed
128




Brown rice flour
Nutty flavour, high in fiber, vitamins, minerals
158


Buckwheat flour
Earthy flavour, high in fiber and minerals
120


Chestnut flour
High in complex carbs + protein, has many properties of grains
100


Coconut flour
Very high in fiber, sweet, adds moisture to baked goods, dense
112


Corn flour/Masa Harina
Finer blend than cornmeal, whole grain
112


Cornmeal (medium)
Good for muffins, coarser baked goods
128


Cornstarch
Starch in combo with heavier flours, sub for cornstarch and good thickener, also makes crisp coating
128




Fava Bean flour
High protein flour, less bitter than garbanzo
132


Garbanzo (chickpea)
High protein flour, good in baked goods
120


Garfava flour
High protein flour, slight bean flavour, good in combo
120


Millet
Sweet tasting flour, nutritious, easy to digest
120


Oat flour
Nutritious flour, good in baked goods
120


Split pea flour
Powdery texture, slightly sweet taste,
160


Potato flour
Adds moisture and shelf-life to baked goods
180


Potato starch
Good thickener, replacement for cornstarch
170


Quinoa flour
Slightly nutty flour, very high in complete protein, adds moisture to baked goods
112



Romano bean
High protein flour, somewhat beany flavour, adds fiber
128


Soy flour
High protein flour, can be somewhat dense
112


Sorghum flour
Sweet tasting flour, slightly grainy flavour
127


Sweet potato
Good thickener, sweet flavour, stiff texture
180


Sweet rice
Good thickener, especially where separation is a concern
204


Tapioca starch
Starch added to flour mixtures, adds chewy texture to baked goods, good thickener
125



Teff flour
Slightly sweet, nutty flavour, molasses flavour ( brands vary )
120


White rice
Bland flour, used in combination with others
158


Thank you to Janice from Real Foods Made Easy for compiling this list together. Its also available as a downloadable (pdf) file: Gluten free flours volume-weight


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